Recently Completed PhD Theses

Jun Kim

‘A Historical and Theological Investigation of the Healing Movement in Korea: With Special Reference to Ik-du Kim, Seong-bong Lee, and Yong-gi Cho’

This thesis explores the theological foundation of the healing movement in Korea based on the works of three Korean theologians: Ik-du Kim, Seong-bong Lee, and Yong-gi Cho. It brings to light continuities and discontinuities in their theologies, the contextual factors which enabled them to develop their ideas and the theological core of the movement formed by them. This work adds to works the wider theology of divine healing, especially in the  Pentecostal/Charismatic traditions.


Jonathan Bornman

 

‘American Murids: Muslim proponents of nonviolence open alternative conversations about Islam, jihad and immigration’ 

 

This ethnography of a Senegalese religious community in New York, the Muridiyya, brings into conversation a nonviolent Sufi Muslim witness with an American discourseon Islam, violence and immigration. This study generates a new theoretical framework for understanding Bamba and the transnational
Muridiyya through the lens of nonviolence. It argues that Murid space making is a social mechanism for peaceful relations with non-Muslims. This thesis reveals the emergence of American Murids committed to the spiritual and ethical values of Bamba and capable of adapting these to the American context.

Daniel C. Button

‘Toward a New Heaven and New Earth: A Scientific, Biblical and Theological Exploration of Continuity and Discontinuity’

This is an interdisciplinary exploration of the level of continuity and discontinuity in the transition from creation to new creation. It brings into dialogue the perspectives of scientific, philosophical and biblical theology, examining several key issues independently in order to synthesise those conclusions into an overall assessment of continuity. It shows that a vigorous Christian environmental response demands a theology of creation which includes an eschatological vision not only for humanity but for the whole earth.

Melody Joy Wachsmuth

 

‘Understanding Identity and Social Change through Narrative: With Special Reference to Roma Pentecostalism in Croatia and Serbia’

Grounded in Anthropology of Christianity, this ethnographic work investigates two Old Romanian speaking Roma communities. It makes use of life stories, participant-observation, and extensive field work to identify several prominent themes: suffering, hardship, and trauma on the one hand and miraculous healing and tangible experiences with God on the other. It shows how identities can be transformed through connecting experiences to reinterpreted stories as part of a localised Pentecostal theology. 

Terence William Garde  

‘Mining God’s Way: Towards mineral resource justice with artisanal gold miners in East Africa’ 

ThIs thesis examines the daily livelihood practices of artisanal gold miners, how these practices are impacted by bigger forces and the impasses caused.  This is the very first study of its kind which adopts an explicitly

Christian (theological) perspective whilst also engaging the social science (theoretical) and technical (practical) framework. The findings inform a new understanding of artisanal mining and offer a new perspective on Christian mission as Mining God’s Way. 

Joan M Wise

‘Seeking Christian Enculturation among Vietnamese Evangelicals’

This thesis seeks enculturated traits which show potential for Christian enculturation in the larger Vietnamese culture through the voices of  Vietnamese Evangelical Christians and those adhering to indigenous ancestral worship practice.   The enculturated traits are said to be in the Evangelical ritual of the Lord’s Supper which, the thesis argues, helps in bridging the cultural gaps between Evangelical beliefs and indigenous pre-Christian practices.

Christian Tsekpoe

‘’Local Species’ in African Soil: The Development of James McKeown’s Mission Models and their Implications for The Church of Pentecost, Ghana’

This thesis examines the mission models of the Revd James McKeown, a British missionary who became the first chairman of The Church of Pentecost (CoP), Ghana. It argues that the IGMA’s emphasis on context and social change, promises its potential to prolong the mission of the Church in Africa into the foreseeable future. This thesis is, therefore, a vital contribution to the growing body of knowledge in the field of missiology.

Edwardneil A. Benavidez

‘Appropriation, Translation and Transformation of Institutionalised Development Discourses: The Case of Faith-based Organisations Doing Development Work in the Philippines’

This study looks into the experiences of five Evangelical faith-based organisations that are doing development work in Metro Manila, Philippines. It also explains how and why those who lead such organisations improve the use of the models they work with often through critical interactions with their peers.

Akintayo Sunday O. Olayinka

‘Peace research in non-violent contexts: A case study among the Southwest Nigerian Yorùbá’

This research examines how a widely acknowledged peaceful community (the Southwest Nigerian Yorùbá) maintains harmony. It also takes a close look at the potential of Yorùbá Christians and Muslims to manage their disputes, crises, and conflicts and maintain peace as part of the Yorùbá religion, culture, and values.

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