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Dr. John Campbell

Senior Lecturer in the Anthropology of Development School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London


BSc (Anthropology) Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA 1973 MA (Anthropology) New York University, New York, New York 1975 DPhil (Social Anthropology) University of Sussex Brighton, Sussex, UK 1981
Senior Lecturer in the Anthropology of Development School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Formerly: •Research Fellow, Institute of African Studies, University of Legon, Ghana. 1977-78. •Lecturer. Department of Sociology. University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 1980-85. •Visiting Research Fellow. School of African & Asian Studies. University of Sussex 1985-87. •Project Manager. Ethiopia Country Program. Oxfam UK. 1987-88. •Research Fellow. Department of Anthropology. Queen's University of Belfast, NI. 1990-91. •Lecturer in Anthropology & Research Associate, Centre for Development Studies, University of Wales, Swansea. 1991-2001
Areas: The anthropology of contemporary Africa, including a concern with: (a) urbanization, urban poverty and state policies; (b) the role of civil society, especially the contribution to development of non-governmental organizations; (c) the resurgence of ethnicity and nationalism in northeastern Africa; (d) the development and use of qualitative research methods in development research (especially the use of combined methodologies); and (e) The link between development and refugees in the Horn of Africa and the operation of the British asylum system (with a particular focus on the work of law and of government agencies involved in determining refugee applications and asylum policy)
Regions: Africa
Publications: A. Books 1. 1986. w/ W. Biermann. The Era of Long-Distance Trade, c.700 to 1700., v.I. External Factors in Tanzanian Economic History. Economic Research Bureau Research Report, University of Dar es Salaam. 138 pp. 2. 1987. w/ Valdo Pons. Urbanization, Urban Planning and Urban Life in Tanzania: An Annotated Bibliography. University of Hull, Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology, Occasional Paper No. 4. 79 pp. 3. 1995. Urbanisation, Urban Planning and Urban Life in Tanzania. [Revised & expanded 2nd edition]. Dept. of Sociology & Social Anthropology, University of Hull. xliv + 205 pp. B. Edited Books 1. 1999. w/ A. Rew. Identity and Affect. Pluto: London. xliv + 205 pp. 2. 2004. w/ J. Holland. Quantitative and Qualitative Methods in Development. IT Publications: London. Pp. 3. 2005. w/ J. Holland. “Convergent or Divergent Understandings of Poverty: Key issues in Development Research”, Focaal: European Journal of Social Anthropology. (special issue) vol. Journal Articles 17. 2006. “Who are the Luo? Oral tradition and disciplinary practices in Anthropology and History”, Journal of African Cultural Studies 18, 1, 73-87 18. 2008. “International development and bilateral aid to Kenya in the 1990s”, Journal of Anthropological Research 64, 2, 249-67 19. 2009. “Caught between the ideology and realities of development: Transiting from the Horn of Africa to Europe”, The LSE Migration Study Unit Working Papers no. 1, see: http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/MSU/papers/msu-working-paper-2009-1_campbell.pdf

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